User:Cole herbert/Annie Bowman

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Cole Herbert

Overview[edit]

Annie Bowman was an author and a reporter in the 19th century America. The great depression was a time of great despair and angst. For many reasons the people of America were depressed and had zero hope when they went to work each and every day. Annie, an everyday person, who strived for greater pastures during the great depression, took advantage of an opportunity given by the government to try to better thyself and achieve the American dream. Average people could strive to be interviewers and journalists and publish the content of the people of the great depression. Average people interviewing other average people is the highlight of this project. Annie interviewed the Hines family of Colombia, Alabama. To try to get recognition and attempt to receive money based off of some goof work, Annie interviewed this family. An average, African American family from the south during the great depression. The content that she received was more than astonishing, seeing how the everyday life of an African American family in the south during the great depression lived.

File:My stone house..jpg
House mid 1930's

Biography[edit]

The Hines family was an average family living in the south during the great depression. Times were low and money was scarce with strict government rules and regulations. Mary Hines, the mother of nine children, was a schoolteacher at the local school, along with four of her children. Four of her other children are diseased, from issues that are not disclosed. Mary’s youngest child is in local high school, the only remaining child still in school. Mary’s family is somewhat well off. Her remaining children that are alive are all working, making this family above the average money wise for African American families during the time period. Mary’s other four children, who are alive, are teaching in schools and making wages. During the times, the wages for workers were not high, each of the children made $30 a month. Mary, as a side job, is a washer. The Hines house was repossessed by the government, and to repay the government, the family had to pay $5 a month for the next seven years of their life. The house that they lived in was very small which was average for an African American family at the time. There was a living room suite and 8 bedrooms. The rooms were not very big and fit just enough space to house the eight children that were living there throughout the years. The father of the household was half blind and could only see a very small amount since his recent eye surgery. He was a very capable man who worked and kept his own garden. He proclaimed that he could “pick cotton a little,” which showed that he was a working man.

Social Context[edit]

The Great Depression in the South

The Hines family was an average family living in the south during the great depression. Times were low and money was scarce with strict government rules and regulations. Mary Hines, the mother of nine children, was a schoolteacher at the local school, along with four of her children. Four of her other children are diseased, from issues that are not disclosed. Mary’s youngest child is in local high school, the only remaining child still in school. Mary’s family is somewhat well off. Her remaining children that are alive are all working,

Family Life

Her remaining children that are alive are all working, making this family above the average money wise for African American families during the time period. Mary’s other four children, who are alive, are teaching in schools and making wages. During the times, the wages for workers were not high, each of the children made $30 a month. Mary, as a side job, is a washer. The Hines house was repossessed by the government, and to repay the government, the family had to pay $5 a month for the next seven years of their life. The house that they lived in was very small which was average for an African American family at the time. There was a living room suite and 8 bedrooms.

Living Quarters

The rooms were not very big and fit just enough space to house the eight children that were living there throughout the years. The father of the household was half blind and could only see a very small amount since his recent eye surgery. He was a very capable man who worked and kept his own garden. He proclaimed that he could “pick cotton a little,” which showed that he was a working man.

References[edit]

  1. Bowman, Annie L. “Folder 3: Bowman, Annie L. (Interviewer): Another Version of the above Interview.” Federal Writers Project Papers.
  2. The Great Depression., catalog
  3. “Federal Writers' Project.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 3 Mar. 2021
  4. “Great Depression History.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 29 Oct. 2009
  5. Ohanian, Lee E., and Barry Eichengreen. "The Great Recession in the Shadow of the Great Depression: A Review Essay on Hall of Mirrors: The Great Depression, the Great Recession, and the Uses and Misuses of History, by Barry Eichengreen." Journal of Economic Literature 55, no. 4 (2017): 1583-601. Accessed April 3, 2021.
  6. Marsh, John. “The Emotional Life of the Great Depression.” Oxford Scholarship Online, Oxford University Press

Bibliography[edit]

Bowman, Annie L. “Folder 3: Bowman, Annie L. (Interviewer): Another Version of the above Interview.” Federal Writers Project Papers, dc.lib.unc.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/03709/id/995/rec/1.

The Great Depression., catalog.lib.unc.edu/catalog/UNCb10288661.

“Federal Writers' Project.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 3 Mar. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Writers%27_Project.

History.com Editors. “Great Depression History.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 29 Oct. 2009, www.history.com/topics/great-depression/great-depression-history.

Ohanian, Lee E., and Barry Eichengreen. "The Great Recession in the Shadow of the Great Depression: A Review Essay on Hall of Mirrors: The Great Depression, the Great Recession, and the Uses and Misuses of History, by Barry Eichengreen." Journal of Economic Literature 55, no. 4 (2017): 1583-601. Accessed April 3, 2021. doi:10.2307/26417166.

Marsh, John. “The Emotional Life of the Great Depression.” Oxford Scholarship Online, Oxford University Press, oxford.universitypressscholarship.com/view/10.1093/oso/9780198847731.001.0001/oso-9780198847731.


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